Science and Weather Together

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As an industry-leading Life Science company, Bayer has its foundation in science, innovation and research. This gives us a unique understanding of the integral role science plays in everyday life. It drives our passion to be a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) education partner for schools, parents & others in our communities. Bayer is  dedicated to advancing STEM education and ensuring that all individuals are scientifically literate. We strive to engage, educate, and inspire the next generation of scientists, engineers, technologists and innovators. At Bayer, we strongly believe it is about making STEM education more accessible and less intimidating – to kids and adults.

LESSON 9

Storms

As frightening as storms can be, they play an important role in maintaining a balance in the atmosphere. In this lesson, set the stage by discussing what perception your student(s) has about storms and why the exist. Talk about whether or not learning about storms, and being more aware of how they behave and operate, can give them more insight into whether or not a storm will become dangerous or not. Will learning about storms allay any irrational fear of storms?

  • What purpose do storms serve in our atmosphere?

  • What are some visual clues that indicate to you that a storm will become severe?

  • Do storms frighten you?  Why?

Teacher Guide: Storms
Lesson Resources: Storms
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Lesson 9: Storms

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1. The life span of a typical thunderstorm is about:

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2. How many stages are there in the life cycle of a thunderstorm?

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3. Which stage of storm development is where most of the severe weather happens?

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4. Air that flows outward from a storm that often creates a "roll cloud" is called a:

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5. About how many storms are in progress around the earth at any one time?

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6. What percentage of all storms actually become severe?

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7. Which hazard usually increases in intensity BEFORE a storm becomes severe?

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8. The type of storm most likely to produce a tornado is called a:

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9. A storm system that produces high winds and can stretch for hundreds of miles is called a:

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10. Which of these hazards is a good indication of how strong a storm's updraft might be?

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Quiz Answers: Storms

EXPERIMENTS AT HOME

Hot & Cold Air Masses

Unequal heating of our atmosphere is the mechanism that helps move air around the planet. Water and air are both types of fluids, so you can study the movement in water to understand the movements of air. Cold water tends to sink, and warm water tends to rise. This experiment helps you visualize the interactions between cold, dense water, and the warmer water than surrounds it. Watch closely to see what happens, and make notes on how you think this matches what happens in the air above you!

Experiment Equipment List:

  • Ice Cube Tray
  • Red and Blue Food Coloring
  • Large Clear Plastic Bin

  • Luke-warm Water

LESSON 10

Tornadoes

Of all the different types of weather phenomena, tornadoes are perhaps the most fascinating and frightening. Some tornadoes are big, some are small, but they all have some things in common. In this IQ Weather lesson, we look at the when, where, and whys of tornado formation!

  • Do you think most severe storms produce tornadoes?

  • What are the weather “ingredients” that make a tornado possible?

  • Are there times when tornadoes are more likely to happen?  Why?

Teacher Guide: Tornadoes
Lesson Resources: Tornadoes
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Lesson 10: Tornadoes

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1. Cyclone and twister are just different names for a:

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2. The average lifespan of a tornado is about:

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3. Which U.S. city is considered the Tornado Capital of the world?

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4. Most tornadoes remain on the ground for:

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5. A funnel cloud becomes a tornado when:

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6. Tornadoes are assigned an EF Rating:

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7. A Tornado Warning means:

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8. A Tornado Watch means

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9. Tornado season usually begins each year in which part of the U.S.?

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10. Which statement is true:

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Quiz Answers: Tornadoes

LESSON 11

Storm Chaser Interview

Chasing storms and tornadoes has become a subject of great interest to many people enthralled by weather. IQ Weather secured an interview with one of the most famous married storm teams in America; Jon and Shawna Davies.  Enjoy learning about storm chasing from the professionals!

  • Why do storm chasers pursue storms and tornadoes?

  • Are most storm chasers meteorologists?

  • What is the most dangerous part of storm chasing?

  • What do the chasers do with the information they gather from storm chasing?

Teacher Guide: Storm Chasers
Lesson Resources: Storm Chasers
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Lesson 11: Storm Chaser Interview

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1. The best way to begin learning how to storm chase is to:

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2. People chase tornadoes to:

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3. You must be a meteorologist to chase storms:

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4. What is the most dangerous part of storm chasing?

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5. When chasing storms, you are most likely to:

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Quiz Answers: Storm Chasers

LESSON 12

Radar

Almost everyone uses weather radar these days. It is easy to use, widely available, and part of daily life. But most people do not understand exactly what they are looking at on a radar display. This lesson discusses a little of the history of radar, how it works, and some of the limitations you need to be aware of. IQ Weather wants your student to be a radar super-user!

  • Do you understand the limitations of radar data?

  • Why is radar data important?

  • How accurate is radar information?

Teacher Guide: Radar
Lesson Resources: Radar
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Lesson 12: Radar

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1. This technology helped make radar detection of tornadoes easier and more accurate:

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2. The Doppler Effect is based on changes in _________ to identify tornadoes.

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3. Dual pol radar helps with rain, debris and hail size because it more accurately:

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4. A radar display indicates how much of the radar signal:

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5. The type of radar display most frequently used by the public is called:

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6. On radar, an object that is displayed in a bright red color indicates:

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7. The curvature of the earth limits the ability for the radar to see:

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8. The radar beam gets ______the farther it gets away from the radar.

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9. Radar based tornado warnings are more accurate for storms:

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10. Which is the best way to confirm the presence of a tornado:

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Quiz Answers: Radar

LESSON 13

Tropical Weather

Tropical areas are nice vacation spots, but the weather in tropical areas can have an impact…directly and indirectly on the rest of the planet.  This lesson examines the area of the planet called the “tropics” and explains how the influence of the sun and oceans drive hurricane formation and the transport of weather to other areas of the world!

  • How is weather in the tropics different from other parts of the world?  Why?

  • How does the geography of the world make the tropics more humid and stormy?

  • Why do hurricanes form in the tropics and not in other areas?

Teacher Guide: Tropical Weather
Lesson Resources: Tropical Weather
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Lesson 13: Tropical Weather

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1. The warmest temperature readings in the tropics is limited by:

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2. Most of the area known as the tropics is over:

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3. The Intertropical Convergence Zone is characterized by:

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4. When does hurricane season normally begin?

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5. For hurricanes to form, the ocean water temperatures need to be above:

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6. The warm ocean water needs to be ______ deep to sustain a hurricane:

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7. The slower a hurricane moves, the greater the threat for:

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8. Winds must be sustained above ____ mph for a storm to be categorized as a hurricane.

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9. Weather in the eye of a hurricane is:

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10. Typhoons, cyclone, willy-willy are all names for:

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Quiz Answers: Tropical Weather

EXPERIMENTS AT HOME

Hurricane Sea Level

The air above us is always pressing down on everything it surrounds. We don’t notice it because we are used to carrying the weight of the air. At sea level, air weighs 14.696 pounds per square inch…which means there is over 2,116 pounds or weight on every square foot of our planet. The weight of the air is called air pressure, and this experiment shows you what happens when the pressure drops in one area. Some people experience aches and pains when the air pressure drops because less air pressure allows joints to swell. Think about how this also affects how the air moves around the high and low pressure areas of Earth by observing the results of this experiment!

Experiment Equipment List: 

  • Dinner Plate

  • Play Dough

  • Candle
  • Lighter or Matches

  • Tall Clear Drinking Glass (2)

  • Glass of water

Go To Lesson #14: Oceans